Ashley Tisdale on Getting in on the Wellness Game, Time Travel and Trying Reiki for the First Time

by:

Beauty


Actress-singer Ashley Tisdale is a big fan of the letter “A” when it comes to wellness. “Wellness should be something attainable and accessible for all,” the 37-year-old shares on the eve of the launch of Being Frenshe, a 45-SKU, Target-exclusive brand dedicated to self-care that she is confident will “transcend the typical approach to product” categories—all while having a decent dose of reality.

“Obviously, a body wash or a candle won’t fix every problem, but for a busy single mom or a stressed-out student, just taking a moment for yourself can be the difference between feeling depleted and feeling renewed.” Besides merging the science of scent with the comfort of rituals, the line also relies heavily on Tisdale’s own journey with mental health, being a mom and paying attention to the little things that boost her mood.

What is wellness to you?

“For me, wellness is an ongoing process of caring for my mental and physical health. I don’t think there’s some end destination called Wellness, and you reach it, and your life is perfect. It’s a journey. Wellness changes for me depending on what I’m feeling and thinking. Sometimes, wellness means taking on a challenge because I know it’s going to feel great to have accomplished something hard. Other times, it’s about having a really cathartic therapy session or taking a Sunday morning walk to clear my head, or turning my notifications off for a day. I think wellness looks different for everybody, but that’s how it looks for me.”

What was the hardest thing about creating or launching this line?

“Being Frenshe is an offshoot of my wellness platform, Frenshe, so it’s a very personal endeavor. I’d had offers to put my name on some white-label products before, but I don’t really see the point of that. Why do something if your heart is not really in it?

During the pandemic lockdown, I was stressed and worried like everyone else, and leaning into my everyday rituals helped me cope. As I noticed how certain scents changed my mood, I started taking notes and learning more about how our brains and moods can be shaped by fragrance.

That’s where the idea for Being Frenshe started, and I knew that if I wanted to create a line, it had to offer something different and meaningful. That was my north star, basically—is this product something that’s just hanging out in someone’s shower stall, or does it actively make their day just a little bit better? Obviously, a body wash or a candle won’t fix every problem, but for a busy single mom or a stressed-out student, just taking a moment for yourself can be the difference between feeling depleted and feeling renewed. And if you can turn those moments into daily rituals, it’s so good for your overall well-being.

So that’s been the guiding principle behind Being Frenshe, and our team has worked incredibly hard at turning that into reality. I have been deeply involved with everything from fragrance development to the textures of the products, from our social rollout to our event planning. So many Zoom calls. I’ve had to step out of my comfort zone sometimes to say, ‘Hey, this product is really good, but it’s not perfect.’ Because I think that if someone trusts Being Frenshe enough to try a product, she should feel like it’s just this wonderfully restorative experience that helps her care for herself. I think the hardest part of creating Being Frenshe has been my drive to get it right, because I truly want these products to help people feel good.”

Is there anything “out there” you do for wellness or self-care?

“Nothing too unusual, honestly. My self-care rituals are probably similar to a lot of other people’s. Meditation and therapy do wonders for my mental health, and I know I feel better after I’ve exercised—even if getting through the actual workout feels tough in the moment. I am also a big believer in the link between gut health and overall well-being, and by working with a naturopathic doctor, I’ve recognized that my body is sensitive to certain foods like dairy. But, generally, food, exercise, rest—those are the things that really make a huge difference in how I feel.

I definitely do like to keep an open mind and try practices that are new to me. Recently, I went to The Mindry, a wellness center in Malibu, and tried reiki for the first time. It’s a Japanese form of energy healing, and I’d always been interested in learning more about it, but actually experiencing it was unlike anything else. I’m planning to write about it for Frenshe soon. And of course, sometimes you try something new and it’s not the right fit, and that’s okay. I think the most important thing is to prioritize your well-being and create rituals that help you feel good.”

Are there any other brands you really respect or like for how they’re handling wellness?

“Yes! I tend to gravitate toward brands that are inclusive and accessible to everybody, no matter where they live or how much time or money they might have. That’s one of the reasons I’m so excited to have Being Frenshe available at Target, because everyone goes to Target, you know? At home, I use Goodnest on our daughter. It’s this really well-edited collection of clean and gentle bath products for little ones. You just add water—it’s very clever. I also love the Headspace app for meditation because it’s easy to use, and it makes meditation accessible to people who don’t know where to begin. I really think that wellness is for everybody, and the more accessible it is, the better.”

What would be your dream product to create?

“Honestly, I was able to do it with the Being Frenshe Soothing Body Serum Stick. It’s the body care product I always wanted but couldn’t find, so I was really persistent in getting it right. You just glide it on, and your skin feels incredible, plus the scents put me in the best mood. When we finally got the formula perfect, I kept using up the lab samples and I kept asking for more—for research purposes, of course.

Aside from that, doesn’t everybody want a time travel machine? My daughter just took her first steps, and already, I’m like, ‘Wait, where did my tiny little baby go?’ I wouldn’t mind being able to hold my newborn again, just for a moment. The cliché is true—they do grow up so fast.”