2023 Food Trends

by:

LifeStyle

When it comes to 2023 food trends, we’re ready for anything—because we’ve seen everything. Remember “unicorn food” from 2017? Banana bread’s great renaissance at the height of the pandemic? And last year, when everyone was putting yogurt on their toast? Again, if a random food combo or edible presentation has popped into someone’s mind (and been made into a viral TikTok), then it’s likely either been on your plate or you’ve dined adjacent to it.

While I may have written that paragraph with an edge of cynicism (skepticism as well), I’m a fan of viral food trends. They brighten up our social media feeds and keep our dining tables colorful. Trends help us explore new flavors and dive deeper into the cultures that have been cooking and eating this way for generations. Long story short: food trends help us reflect upon where we’ve been and provide insight into where we’re going.

For an understanding of the food journey we’ll be embarking on in 2023, we tapped none other than our favorite viral food blogger. That’s right, the Feel Good Foodie herself, Yumna Jawad, is breaking down the 2023 food trends that will be everywhere in the coming months. Keep reading for her predictions—the future’s looking bright for food.

Featured image by Michelle Nash.

From butter boards to baked oatmeal to pasta chips, 2022 was a year of comfort food and surprising culinary delights. But with only a few days left until 2023, we are already hungry for what’s to come in the new year. Here’s what’s going to be on the menu in 2023.

Image courtesy of Feel Good Foodie

1. Time-Saving Meals

Busy families are going to keep looking for ways to save time, money, and waste in 2023 as food costs stay high and peoples’ lives get busier than ever. One-pot or one-pan meals are a fast, easy way to feed your family—just dump your ingredients in a pot and go! Make-ahead meals you can freeze easily and batch meals that stretch over a few days are going to remain popular as well for all those meal preppers who don’t want to cook every night.

Recipes to try:

Image by Michelle Nash

2. Mushrooms

Mushrooms are no longer a meal sidekick—they’re transitioning to becoming the star and go-to main ingredient due to their earthy, umami flavor profile and hearty substance. They’re not only versatile with an abundance of varieties and flavors, but you can do a lot with them: sauté, bake, and fry.

Recipes to try:

Image courtesy of Feel Good Foodie

3. Boards Boards and MORE Boards

With butter boards and charcuterie boards becoming a staple of 2022, the board concept is here to stay in the coming year. Mix it up with new, unexpected foods like Stuffed Dates, Stuffed Tomatoes, unique platters like this Smoked Salmon Platter, seasonal veggies, or hummus and labneh boards for a healthier spin on the trend no matter what time of year or occasion. 

Recipes to try:

Image by Suruchi Avasthi

4. Stuffed foods

Who doesn’t love food you can eat in one cute and delicious bite? We’ve seen a rise in popularity of dumplings and empanadas in recent years but I think people will be taking it one step further this year and creating unique fillings or even leaving the pastry behind for other wrapped foods featuring unexpected ingredients inside and out.

Recipes to try:

Image courtesy of Feel Good Foodie

5. Odd combos that work

We’ve seen unlikely duos in the past, but with the rise of things like “Pilk” and balsamic cola, I think foodies are becoming more adventurous and a bit like mad scientists in the kitchen. You can dip your toe in the water with simple but unexpected combos like avocado ice cream and dates with eggs.

Recipes to try:

Image by Suruchi Avasthi

6. Alternative Proteins

There’s a lot of hype around plant-based meals these days, but they often include manufactured ingredients. We’ll be seeing people using natural, plant-based proteins like grains, legumes, nuts, cauliflower, broccoli, and mushrooms in recipes that are filling, nourishing, and easier on the wallet. This will also be a big draw for foodies in the uncertain economic times of 2023.

Recipes to try:

Image courtesy of Feel Good Foodie

7. Versatile foods

Home cooks will have an eye to versatility in 2023. What ingredients and dishes will stretch their budget and pantry? Oatmeal is one star ingredient that can be used in a variety of traditional and new ways—and isn’t just a sweet food anymore. While it will always remain a staple for mornings, why not try an egg on top?

Recipes to try:

Image courtesy of Feel Good Foodie

8. Nostalgic Foods

Now more than ever, it feels like folks just want a little comfort and a reminder of simpler times. I predict dishes “like mom used to make”—but elevated—will be more popular than ever. And you’ll continue to see both home cooks and restaurant chefs dive into creative twists on the classics. Think dishes like hamburger helper, spaghetti and meatballs, deviled eggs, and cheesy casseroles but on a gourmet level.

Recipes to try:

Image by Ashleigh Amoroso

9. Cabbage and other fermented foods

We’ve seen eggplant, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower all take center stage as the “it” veggies in recent years, but what about cabbage? There’s been a rise in interest in fermented foods for their gut health benefits, versatility and wallet-friendly prices of late, and I think cabbage is going to continue to shine in that category via sauerkraut’s resurgence. But on its own, simply sautéing or roasting cabbage with various spices is an easy and affordable way to incorporate it into your everyday diet.

Recipes to try:

Image by Michelle Nash

10. Mediterranean cuisines

American home cooks are becoming more and more open to working with new flavor profiles, unique textures and methods of cooking inspired by other cultures. There is an increased appetite for Mediterranean-inspired twists on everyday recipes due to the incredible spices and fresh ingredients that I think we’ll continue to see permeate American’s everyday meals. Beyond the mass appeal of hummus, I’m seeing ingredients like labneh used more in place of yogurt, za’atar sprinkled on roasted veggies instead of oregano, and dates being used more and more to sweetened desserts instead of traditional sweeteners.

Recipes to try:

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